Protections for Persons with Disabilities

1990

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) establishing the most comprehensive civil rights law prohibiting unjustified discrimination based on disability in employment, public services, public accommodation, and telecommunications. Disabilities included both mental and physical impairments, and do not need to be severe or permanent to be a disability. The ADA has roots in…

Direct Operations by Counties Come to End

1992

In the early part of the 1990s, the county boards ended their direct operation of the school-age programs and residential services. The July 1990 State Capital Bill included $7.3 million for housing allocated to county boards to enable those with developmental disabilities to select traditional residences of their choice in their community. Similarly, early intervention and preschool programs also moved…

Public Policy Pioneer Elizabeth Boggs

1998

At the end of the 1980s, most Americans were not fully aware of the discrimination faced by people with disabilities each and every day. With no public funding, a Task Force on the Rights and Empowerment of Americans with Disabilities was formed, which included 38 volunteer members. One task force member was Cleveland, Ohio, native Elizabeth Monroe Boggs. This math…

Ohio Offers Flexible Solutions

1993

In 1993, Senate Bill 21, known as the omnibus bill because of it’s wide scope of enactments, was passed by the Ohio General Assembly and signed by the governor. Under S.B. 21, both the Ohio Department of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities and the county boards were afforded additional flexibility in finding solutions to meet the needs and circumstances of Ohioans…

Segregation is Discrimination

1999

In the summer of 1999, the United States Supreme Court in Olmstead v. L.C., held that unjustified segregation of persons with disabilities constitutes discrimination in violation of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Plaintiffs Lois Curtis and Elaine Wilson were voluntarily admitted to the psychiatric unit of state-run Georgia Regional Hospital. Following assessments by professionals, it was…