Report Sets Stage for County System

1968 - Cuyahoga County

The 1960s began a flurry of activity for the parents’ movement as many worked to improve the conditions in institutions, launched new community services in education and employment, and initiated legislation to improve the lives of people with disabilities. In Ohio, Gov. Michael DiSalle formed the Governor’s Committee for the Mentally Retarded and tasked the committee with studying the community…

A President Takes A Personal Interest

1968 - Cuyahoga County

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy established the President’s Panel on Mental Retardation to recommend policy changes to better serve people with developmental disabilities. In a letter to the panel, President Kennedy said, “For over 5 million Americans suffering from some degree of mental retardation, our present system of care might better be called our system of don’t care.” Based…

Ensuring the Dignity of Ohioans

1966

In the mid-1960s, the Broadview Veteran’s Hospital was turned over by the federal Veteran’s Administration and later reopened as the Broadview Center for the Mentally Retarded, which was the only state institution for people with developmental disabilities in the Cleveland area. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson, established The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID), formerly The President’s…

County Board System Established

1967

In 1967, Ohio’s 88 county boards of mental retardation were created by the Ohio General Assembly through amended Senate Bill 169, which was signed into law by Gov. James Rhodes. The county boards were established to raise funds and provide services and support to people with developmental disabilities, as well as further the training and education of professional personnel. This…

Ohio Establishes Division of MR

1969

Near the close of the decade, the Ohio legislature created the process by which mental retardation eventually would gain independent-department status. The Division of Mental Retardation was created within the Department of Mental Hygiene and Correction through House Bill 178. In 1969, the Ohio Association for Retarded Citizens (now simply known as The Arc of Ohio) successfully lobbied for the…